In this file:

 

·         House members introduce Whole Milk for Healthy Kids Act

Legislation builds on previous bills and USDA rule by allowing School Lunch Program to offer both unflavored and flavored whole milk.

 

·         Freshman lawmakers ask FDA to crack down on milk imitators

Group of 10 bipartisan members of Congress write letter to FDA urging strong action against mislabeled milk and dairy products.

 

 

House members introduce Whole Milk for Healthy Kids Act

Legislation builds on previous bills and USDA rule by allowing School Lunch Program to offer both unflavored and flavored whole milk.

 

Feedstuffs

Jan 30, 2019

 

In 2010, Congress passed the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, which amended nutrition standards in the National School Lunch Program. Among the changes, the law mandated that flavored milk offered within the program must be fat free. This law, along with lower participation in the program, led to an alarming decline in milk consumption in schools since 2010.

 

Rep. Glenn "GT" Thompson (R., Pa.) and House Agriculture Committee chairman Collin Peterson (D., Minn.) have introduced a bill to allow both unflavored and flavored whole milk to be offered in school cafeterias. Declining milk consumption in schools not only affects students but also dairy farm families and rural communities across the nation.

 

H.R. 832, the Whole Milk for Healthy Kids Act of 2019, recognizes the importance of milk to the health and well-being of growing children. Last year, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue directed the U.S. Department of Agriculture to allow schools to serve 1% flavored milk in school meal programs. H.R. 832 would allow whole milk to be included as well.

 

To help encourage nutritious options in the National School Lunch Program and increase consumption, Thompson had introduced legislation – H.R. 4101, the School Milk Nutrition Act of 2017 – to provide schools with the option to serve 1% flavored milk varieties. This latest legislation builds on the previous bill and USDA’s rule by allowing whole milk -- both unflavored and flavored -- to be offered within the National School Lunch Program...

 

more

https://www.feedstuffs.com/news/house-members-introduce-whole-milk-healthy-kids-act

 

 

Freshman lawmakers ask FDA to crack down on milk imitators

Group of 10 bipartisan members of Congress write letter to FDA urging strong action against mislabeled milk and dairy products.

 

Jacqui Fatka, Feedstuffs 

Feb 01, 2019

 

A group of bipartisan freshman members of Congress urged the U.S. Food & Drug Administration to take strong action against manufacturers that falsely label non-dairy products as milk.

 

Reps. Anthony Brindisi (D., N.Y.) and John Joyce (R., Pa.) led a bipartisan letter to FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, along with Reps. Anthony Delgado (D., N.Y.), Daniel Meuser (R., Pa.), Angie Craig (D., Minn.), Dusty Johnson (R., S.D.), Ben Cline (R., Va.,), Jim Hagedorn (R., Minn.), Russ Fulcher (R., Ida.) and Anthony Gonzalez (R., Ohio), in objection to the growing trend of imitation or substitute dairy products labeled with standardized dairy terms, saying it “has undermined consumer confidence -- the very purposes of standards of identity for foods.”

 

“We urge you to make crystal clear that dairy imitators will not be considered in compliance with standards of identity if they merely add the name of a plant material in front of a standardized dairy term or otherwise reference dairy terms,” the freshman members wrote. “Modifying the word 'milk' with a plant product descriptor does not make the label accurate or appropriate.”

 

FDA’s federal standard defines “milk” as coming from the “milking of one or more healthy cows.” FDA says food labels are meant to “inform consumers about what they’re buying, and standards of identity are used to ensure that foods have the characteristics expected by consumers.”

 

“It’s simple: If comes from a cow, it’s milk; if it doesn’t, it’s not,” Brindisi said. “Why would we call a product something it’s not? Dairy farmers in upstate New York set high standards for the milk they produce. Copycat products shouldn’t be able to profit off of their hard work.”

 

more

https://www.feedstuffs.com/news/freshman-lawmakers-ask-fda-crack-down-milk-imitators