In this file:

 

·         Farmer Says He’ll Give Trump An Easement To Build The Wall

…  “We build fences around cattle and cattle still get out,” he said. “You still have to put a fence around them to maintain the integrity of your property”…

 

·         Arizona Ranchers Share Experience with Border Security

The U.S. border with Mexico spans 1,954 miles, and ranchers are on the front lines for most of it…

 

·         CNN’s Jim Acosta mocked for accidentally proving that border walls work

... “Jim Acosta just posted one of the biggest self owns ever,” social media strategist Caleb Hull responded. ‘He's walking along the border where there's a wall in place talking about how there's nothing that ‘resembles a national emergency situation’ and ‘there's no migrants trying to rush.’ That's because there's a wall, Jim”...

 

 

Farmer Says He’ll Give Trump An Easement To Build The Wall

 

By Anna-Lisa Laca, Farm Journal's Milk, Online and Business Editor

via AgWeb - January 10, 2019

 

James Johnson grew up farming on the border between U.S. and Mexico. In fact, his great grandfather bought their New Mexico farm in 1918. Their 7,000-acre ranch runs along 14 miles of the border just west of El Paso. Johnson says the wall is needed and he’s willing to give the government an easement on his land to build it.

 

“My house is a half mile off the Mexican border,” he told AgriTalk host Chip Flory. “When I'm standing in the bathroom, looking out the bathroom window, my view is Mexico and the border.”

 

According to Johnson, some stretches of the 14 miles his farm runs along the border is protected by a vehicle barrier, but the rest is barbed wire fence that he’s required to maintain. He says the power struggle between President Trump and the Democrats has less to do with border security than it does preventing the president from keeping a campaign promise.

 

“I think this is a complete stone wall on their part just trying to shut him down,” he said.

 

Is It A Crisis?

 

Every stretch of the border has its own problems, Johnson said. In 2004 and 2005, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) estimated there were 700 to 750 people crossing the border on their ranch each night. The Johnson family was very vocal about the issue and as a result got additional resources to help combat the issues they were facing.

 

“We got more technology thrown at us, plus the manpower,” Johnson said. “We went from 150 border patrol agents to 400. We still see drive-through and we still see foot traffic. But when they secure one area, it pushes somewhere else and that's what I think the other side doesn't see with this fence.”

 

The border wall won’t solve all of the problems, Johnson said, but he thinks it’s a necessary place to start.

 

“We build fences around cattle and cattle still get out,” he said. “You still have to put a fence around them to maintain the integrity of your property.”

 

In New Mexico, the influx of asylum seekers is causing real issues, Johnson added.

 

“Hidalgo County, which is the county to the west, actually has the smallest border crossing in New Mexico,” he explained. “Lordsberg, New Mexico, is in Hidalgo County and the day after Christmas they filed for a state of emergency because they're so overly taxed. Their little Hidalgo County Medical Center is staffed by seven and their personnel process through hundreds and hundreds of these asylum seekers a day.”

 

“The crisis has always been,” he said. “South Texas is in a crisis right now and the boot heel region in New Mexico is in a crisis right now.”

 

Can The Government Build The Wall On Private Property? ...

 

more, including audio [10:59 min.] 

https://www.agweb.com/article/farmer-says-hell-give-trump-an-easement-to-build-the-wall/

 

 

Arizona Ranchers Share Experience with Border Security

 

By Wyatt Bechtel, Drovers, Associate Editor

via AgWeb - January 10, 2019

 

Note: The original version of this story ran online and in Drovers magazine during March 2018. The story has been updated to reflect recent debate on funding for a border wall.

 

The U.S. border with Mexico spans 1,954 miles, and ranchers are on the front lines for most of it.

 

For the past few decades, border enforcement and security has increased to halt illegal immigration and drug smuggling. In 1989, construction on the first major border fence began in San Diego, stretching 46 miles east.

 

President George W. Bush signed the Secure Fence Act of 2006 on Oct. 26, 2006, adding nearly 700 miles of fencing structures and more enforcement officials.

 

More recently President Donald Trump campaigned on a platform of border security, much of it hinging on building a wall. From the start of his presidency, funding for a border wall has been under scrutiny. The debate finally reached its boiling point on Dec. 21, 2018, when Trump opted out of signing a bill that would fund the government because it lacked $5.7 billion to pay for a border wall.

 

During the standoff between Trump and Congress that has seen the government enter its second longest shutdown, the debate has only intensified.

 

During his first primetime address from the Oval Office on Jan. 15, President Trump shared stories of how illegal immigration and drug smuggling have impacted the lives of American citizens.

 

“To those who refuse to compromise in the name of border security, I would ask: Imagine if it was your child, your husband, or your wife whose life was so cruelly shattered and totally broken?” Trump says.

 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) gave a response following the president’s speech.

 

“The fact is we all agree we need to secure our borders while honoring our values. We can build the infrastructure and roads at our ports of entry. We can install new technology to scan cars and trucks for drugs coming into our nation. We can hire the personnel we need to facilitate trade and immigration at the border. We can fund more innovation to detect unauthorized crossings,” Pelosi says.

 

While both Trump and Democratic leadership agree border security is needed, they still can’t come to a resolution, largely because of the debate on the wall. Originally the wall was intended to be made of concrete. The Administration had prototypes built at a testing area in California, with the wall sections 30 feet high and made of solid concrete. The vision of the wall has pivoted, with Trump saying a steel slat fence, similar to today’s current barrier fence along portions of the border, would be more ideal.

 

In Arizona, hundreds of miles of steel fencing were built, with the Secure Fence Act forcing traffic to more remote areas of the border. Some ranchers welcome the idea of building a wall, but they say it won’t do any good without boots on the ground. Here are perspectives from two ranchers on the Arizona border.

 

Roads First, Walls Later ...

 

“No Man’s Land” ...

 

Impacts on Ranching ...

 

“No Silver Bullet” ...

 

more, including links, photos

https://www.agweb.com/article/arizona-ranchers-share-experience-with-border-security/

 

 

CNN’s Jim Acosta mocked for accidentally proving that border walls work

 

By Brian Flood, Fox News

Jan 10, 2019

 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi might want to confiscate someone’s selfie stick.

 

CNN’s Jim Acosta was mocked across social media on Thursday for posting a video that was meant to downplay President Trump's claims of a border crisis -- but ended up supporting his argument that border barriers improve security.

 

“Here are some of the steel slats that the president’s been talking about,” Acosta said while reporting from the southern border. “But as we’re walking along here, we’re not seeing any kind of imminent danger.”

 

The CNN reporter added, “There are no migrants trying to rush toward this fence.”

 

Acosta then declared there was “no sign of the national emergency that the president has been talking about” and it was “tranquil” near him. He captioned the video, “I found some steel slats down on the border. But I don’t see anything resembling a national emergency situation.. at least not in the McAllen TX area of the border where Trump will be today.”

 

Early Thursday evening, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders retweeted Acosta’s tweet with a proud clapback: “When I went with President @realDonaldTrump to the border today I never imagined @Acosta would be there doing our job for us and so clearly explaining why WALLS WORK. Thanks Jim!”

 

CNN’s chief White House correspondent – who seemingly uploaded the video from a local Burger King – is in Texas awaiting Trump’s border visit. While Acosta often clashes with the president and his aides, pundits suggested he did the president a favor this time.

 

Media watchdogs were quick to point out that the CNN reporter’s video helps prove Trump’s point that a wall or barrier along the Southern border could help prevent illegal border crossings.

 

“Jim Acosta just posted one of the biggest self owns ever,” social media strategist Caleb Hull responded. ‘He's walking along the border where there's a wall in place talking about how there's nothing that ‘resembles a national emergency situation’ and ‘there's no migrants trying to rush.’ That's because there's a wall, Jim.”

 

Others swiping at Acosta included one of his former CNN colleagues Peter Hamby...

 

more

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/cnns-jim-acosta-mocked-for-accidently-proving-that-border-walls-work