… “Well, she was showing sheep and I was showing cattle and we were about that age,” Fritz Frey said. “It was around 1984 and I was 19 and, you know, I figured I’d go check out the girls in the sheep barn”… “He had really nice steers,” she recalled…

 

 

Finding love at the Pennsylvania Farm Show

 

by Jason Nark, The Philadelphia Inquirer (PA)

January 9, 2019

 

HARRISBURG — When she saw him through the haze of whirling fur and hay dust, all that neighing and mooing and oinking began to sound like an angel’s harp, and the manure took on a more floral tone. Love was blooming at the Pennsylvania Farm Show.

 

He had a dimpled chin and his hair wasn’t so gray, but what Nancy Frey, then MacCauley, saw that day among the livestock decades ago convinced her that Fritz Frey was the one.

 

“He had really nice steers,” she recalled Tuesday morning.

 

Pennsylvania is halfway through its 103rd annual Farm Show, with the usual prize rabbits, hog auctions, live calf births, and famous milkshakes that visitors come to expect. But for the farmers and 4-H members who converge from all corners of the state, the weeklong show is also a chance to meet new friends, catch up with old ones, and, yes, even forge a love fierce enough to melt the butter sculpture.

 

“Well, she was showing sheep and I was showing cattle and we were about that age,” Fritz Frey said. “It was around 1984 and I was 19 and, you know, I figured I’d go check out the girls in the sheep barn.”

 

Nancy came from the Chester County 4-H Club. Fritz belonged to the 4-H Club in Lancaster County. In the alchemy of agricultural romance, sheep people and cattle folks don’t mix well. Out west, cattlemen referred to sheep as “range maggots,” and a few members of the Frey family may have thrown that insult around.

 

Still, Fritz was smitten and would help Nancy out with the sheep at the show after tending to the cattle. Mostly, he focused on Nancy, but still learned a few things about sheep.

 

“Yeah, that I don’t like them,” he said with a laugh. "I guess opposites attract.”

 

The Farm Show is full of teens on school trips and others who’ve been excused from classes this week to show their livestock. Others come to help their families. Occasionally, they get free time. Farmers, in general, don’t often get to meet other farmers, unless they live close by or bump into one another at the local feed and supply. The Farm Show might not be a real estate convention in sunny Las Vegas, but it’s still a chance to socialize...

 

more, including photos

http://www.philly.com/news/farm-agriculture--20190109.html