[Mon]: China is reportedly paying farmers $175 per each culled pig “as an incentive to report (African Swine Fever),” Joe Lardy of CHS Hedging said… [Fri]: National carcass base rose 79 cents… Iowa-Minnesota carcass base rose 55 cent… USDA reported carcass cutout values this afternoon rose 4 cents… “Fears persist that cases of African swine fever are being covered up or under-reported, keeping uncertainty levels high,” Stewart-Peterson said. Despite a bearish session today, February hogs are $1.30 higher… 

 

Farm Commodity Newsletter/Iowa Farmer Today

 

Mon 1/7/2019 9:12 AM

 

Lean hogs - February lean hogs opened last week with “rocket boosters,” Blue Line Futures’ Oliver Sloup said, but faded as the week wore on. “We continue to believe there is opportunity to the buy-side over the long term, but have been playing the deferred months in futures and options,” he said.

 

China is reportedly paying farmers $175 per each culled pig “as an incentive to report (African Swine Fever),” Joe Lardy of CHS Hedging said. This comes after the disease is continuing to spread across China, despite efforts to curb the disease.

 

China cracking down on ASF reporting

 

After concerns the extent of African swine fever was being under-reported in China, the country has warned their pork industry “that covering up cases of (ASF) is a crime,” Allendale said. This comes after a dead pig was found dead on a Taiwanese beach, “prompting Taipei to claim Beijing was not sharing accurate information.”

 

Cattle fell hard to end the week last week, as “we knew there was some weather premium baked into the market,” Blue Line Futures said.

 

Fri 1/4/2019 4:28 PM

 

In weighted average negotiated prices for barrows and gilts, USDA reported;

 

•           National carcass base rose 79 cents to $48.22/cwt. (week ago: $45.17)

•           National live fell 97 cents to $35.82 (week ago: $35.98)

•           Iowa-Minnesota carcass base rose 55 cents to $49.26 (week ago: $44.93)

 

USDA reported carcass cutout values this afternoon rose 4 cents at $72.00/cwt. (week ago: $70.46)

 

Choppy and two-sided trade was the story of lean hogs today, The Hightower Report said. However, traders are “optimistic that trade negotiations will go well next week and that China will eventually buy U.S. pork, but for now, tariffs are high.”

 

“Fears persist that cases of African swine fever are being covered up or under-reported, keeping uncertainty levels high,” Stewart-Peterson said. Despite a bearish session today, February hogs are $1.30 higher this week, while the April future is 25 cents higher on the week.

 

Cattle suffers 'significant technical damage'

 

After February cattle opened higher today, they traded sharply lower doing “significant technical damage,” The Hightower Report said. The market hit its lowest level since Dec. 20, and the dry 7-day forecast in the plains may have caused a weaker beef price.

 

This week, the estimated slaughter for hogs came in at 1.835 mln head, up almost 400,000 from last week, and up 78,000 from this time last year.

 

Cattle slaughter was estimated at 428,000 head, rising 64,000 head from last week. However, that number is down 33,000 head from this period last year.

 

WASDE delayed due to shutdown

 

The January WASDE report has been delayed “until further notice,” Michael Headlee of CHS Hedging said. The expectation is traders will learn the report’s release date after the partial government shutdown is resolved.

 

In the latest update from the Government shutdown, Democratic senator Chuck Schumer said President Trump threatened to “keep the government closed for a very long period of time, months or even years,” Reuters reported

 

Corn

 

There was “really nice trade to see corn come back after last week,” Chris Dudics of The Andersons said. He said there was good technical action this week.

 

Ethanol: The weekly Ethanol report showed a decrease of 31,000 barrels in production to 1.011 mln barrels per day. Stocks, however, were up 100,000 barrels to 23.2 mln barrels. Michael Headlee of CHS Hedging said ethanol margins continued improvements but stay negative.

 

Soybeans

 

“Storing beans has paid off, but let’s not get too greedy,” Chris Dudics, representative of The Andersons said. He noted that with the government shutdown being uncertain, without final production it will be tough to gauge and the market could be volatile.

 

The continued dry weather in Brazil has some private estimators “downgrading the Brazilian crop anywhere from 105-115 mmt,” Stewart-Peterson said. That number is down from the 120-122 mmt figure traders have been working with. “While nothing is guaranteed, it looks likely that the highest production estimate for the year is already behind the market.”

 

Wheat

 

Wheat is gaining support from high corn and soybean prices, including a lack of snow cover on much of the planted winter wheat. “While the near-term forecasts look non-threatening, one significant cold snap could create major concerns,” Stewart-Peterson said.

 

Wheat went higher on “technical buying and lowered estimates of wheat seedings,” Michael Headlee of CHS Hedging said. Informa placed U.S. winter wheat seedings at 31.513 mln acres, which is down 1.022 mln from last year.

 

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