In this file:

 

·         2nd dead hog floats onto Taiwan's Kinmen, heightens fears of ASF spread (Jan 4)

·         Second dead hog found on Kinmen County beach (Jan 4)

·         Three more passengers fined for bringing meat products into Taiwan (Jan 4)

·         Dead Kinmen hog tests positive for African swine fever (Jan 3)

·         How a Dead Pig Is Further Soiling China-Taiwan Relations (Jan 7)

 

 

2nd dead hog floats onto Taiwan's Kinmen, heightens fears of ASF spread

Another dead hog floats onto island in Taiwan's Kinmen County, day after other dead pig tests positive for African Swine Fever

 

By Keoni Everington, Taiwan News  

2019/01/04

 

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) -- A dead hog was reported to have washed up on a beach in Taiwan's Kinmen County this morning, a day after a dead pig which had also washed up on the island county's shores tested positive for African Swine Fever (ASF), according to CNA.

 

Coast Guard Administration (CGA) Director-General Lee Chung-wei (李仲威) said that at 8:40 a.m. this morning, a dead hog was found washed up on a beach on ​Hsiaochiu (小坵, Xiaoqiu) Island in Kinmen's Wuchiu Township. Because there are no pig farms on the tiny island, the carcass of the hog had obviously drifted from another location by sea.

 

Lee stressed that epidemic prevention personnel had already been deployed to the scene and the area where the hog had washed ashore had been sealed off.

 

As for the dead pig discovered Kinmen Island on Monday (Dec. 31), test results on Thursday (Jan. 3) reveled that it was positive for ASF, according to authorities. The Bureau of Animal and Plant Health Inspection and Quarantine later today will hold the "2nd Meeting on the Central Emergency Operation Center's Response to African Swine Fever."

 

The Council of Agriculture said Thursday it would take measures to protect the island’s 11,000 hogs, as well as ban the transport of pork products from Kinmen to the rest of Taiwan for 14 days.

 

Taiwan has recently toughened up...

 

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https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3610090

 

 

Second dead hog found on Kinmen County beach

 

By Yu Hsiao-han, Amy Huang and Elizabeth Hsu, Focus Taiwan News Channel

2019/01/04

 

Taipei, Jan. 4 (CNA) A dead hog was spotted Friday on a beach in Xiaoqiu islet, Kinmen County, four days after a first carcass was found at another coastal location in Kinmen.

 

The dead pig was clearly brought by the tide as there are no pig farms on the Kinmen-administrated islet, said Coast Guard Administration (CGA) Director-General Lee Chung-wei (李仲威).

 

The spot where the pig was found has been cordoned off for inspection by quarantine personnel, he added.

 

Taiwan has been on high alert since the carcass of a dead hog was found Monday on a beach in Kinmen's Jinsha Township by Coast Guard personnel

 

Authorities are concerned that an outbreak of African Swine Fever (ASF) in China could spread to Taiwan and Kinmen, which is only about 2 km (1.2 miles) east of the mainland Chinese city of Xiamen.

 

The first carcass was confirmed as being infected with ASF on Thursday.

 

On Friday, quarantine personnel were dispatched to the 10 hog farms situated within a 5 km radius of the first site to collect tissue samples for ASF testing, according to Kinmen County Animal and Plant Disease Control Center.

 

Center director Wen Shui-cheng (文水成) said there are a total of 2,100 hogs at the farms and samples will be collected from 10 pigs at each location. He added that the center has instructed local townships to send local vets to inspect pig farms outside the 5 km alert zone.

 

Wen said that due to its proximity to China, 200-300 tons of garbage float from the mainland to Kinmen each year. Dead hogs have on occasion been spotted among the garbage, he said, therefore, it is possible the pig carcass found in Jinsha is from China.

 

The Bureau of Animal and Plant Health Inspection and Quarantine (BAPHIQ) under the Cabinet-level Council of Agriculture said the results of the tests will be announced on Jan. 12 at the latest.

 

Travelers waiting to leave Kinmen at Shangyi airport and Shuitou Wharf have been warned...

 

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http://focustaiwan.tw/news/asoc/201901040007.aspx

 

 

Three more passengers fined for bringing meat products into Taiwan

 

By Chiu Chun-chin and Flor Wang, Focus Taiwan News Channel

2019/01/04

 

Taipei, Jan. 4 (CNA) Three more travelers were fined NT$200,000 (US$6,470) on Friday for bringing meat products into the country, according to Taipei Customs.

 

Two travelers arriving in Taiwan from China and one coming from Hong Kong were issued the fine for violating the Statute for Prevention and Control of Infectious Animal Disease, Taipei Customs said.

 

A Chinese tourist, identified by his family name Wang (), was found with 45 grams of cooked pig liver and 673 grams of fruit in his carry-on bag upon arrival at Taoyuan International Airport from Changchun in Jilin province as a member of a tour group.

 

Wang said he had the food with him in case he got hungry.

 

A passenger from Hong Kong surnamed Shao () and a Taiwanese traveler surnamed Yang (), were found with 660 grams of sausage and 800 grams of biscuits containing pork, respectively.

 

Although fines ranging between NT$200,000 and NT$1 million have been imposed on passengers smuggling in meat products since Dec. 18, the number of offenders has not dropped, Taipei Customs said.

 

To avoid being fined, arriving passengers who are unsure whether the items they are carrying are allowed into the country are advised to first seek information at the No. 7 Goods to declare/Customs service counter at the airport, it said...

 

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http://focustaiwan.tw/news/asoc/201901040016.aspx

 

 

Dead Kinmen hog tests positive for African swine fever

 

By Yang Shu-min and Ko Lin, Focus Taiwan News Channel

2019/01/03

 

Taipei, Jan. 3 (CNA) Test results conducted on a pig carcass found in Taiwan's offshore Kinmen County came back positive for African swine fever (ASF), the Council of Agriculture (COA) confirmed Thursday.

 

The dead hog was found Monday on a beach in Kinmen County's Jinsha Township by Coast Guard personnel just kilometers away from China's southeastern coast, raising concerns that the outbreak of ASF in China could spread to Taiwan.

 

Samples collected from the dead hog were sent to the COA's Animal Health Research Institute (AHRI) for testing, and Chiu Chui-chang (邱垂章), head of the AHRI, confirmed Thursday that the results of those tests indicate the pig was infected with ASF.

 

To date, it is not known whether the dead hog floated to Kinmen from China or came from a local farm, according to Hsu Jung-bin (徐榮彬), a senior official with the COA's Bureau of Animal and Plant Health Inspection and Quarantine.

 

Authorities have begun carrying out county-wide inspections on Kinmen's hog farms for possible ASF infection, Hsu said.

 

Kinmen currently has 68 farms, with about 11,000 hogs…

 

more    

http://focustaiwan.tw/news/asoc/201901030013.aspx

 

 

How a Dead Pig Is Further Soiling China-Taiwan Relations

 

Ralph Jennings, VOA

January 07, 2019

 

TAIPEI —

 

A hog evidently tossed into the ocean from China washed up on New Year’s Eve along Kinmen, an outlying Taiwanese-held islet. Local agricultural inspectors later tested the carcass positive for African swine flu, an infectious disease that has led to the slaughter of some 600,000 pigs in China.

 

Dispose the animal and move on? Not so fast. The mid-sized, brownish hog quickly became not just a household media image in Taiwan but also a new issue showing the depths of an icy impasse between the leaders of Taiwan and China.

 

Taiwan wants China to turn over more information about the hog so authorities in Taipei can help stop the deadly swine flu from reaching its own giant pork industry.

 

China hasn’t answered a letter from Taiwan’s Council of Agriculture about the pig or said much else. Communist leaders see self-ruled Taiwan as part of their turf, not a separate country, and won’t talk about anything at all unless the government in Taipei agrees that the two sides belong to a single China.

 

“I can only speculate, but when relations are better, Beijing would definitely first give Taiwan a heads up and say ‘here's how things are,’” said Huang Kwei-bo, vice dean of the international affairs college at National Chengchi University in Taipei.

 

China and Taiwan have been ruled separately and seldom gotten along since the Chinese civil war of the 1940s, when Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalists lost to Mao Zedong’s Communists. The fleeing Nationalists rebased their government in Taiwan. More militarily powerful China still insists that the two sides eventually unite.

 

Swine flu risk ...

 

Health politics ... 

 

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https://www.voanews.com/a/china-taiwan-hog-swine-flu/4731589.html