In this file:

 

·         African Swine Fever’s Tragedy of the Commons

No matter how many miles separate China and the U.S., they are connected by shared and limited resources…

 

·         Keep America ASF-free following proper Customs protocol

Travelers declaring they have been to an ASF-positive country should be diverted to a secondary ag screening.

 

·         African Swine Fever Hot Topic at Midwest Pork Conference

… “There is no doubt the Chinese government is very concerned about this situation. This is a disease with no vaccine, it’s now spread 2400 miles far and wide across China, it’s largely uncontrolled, and it will kill millions of hogs”…

 

 

African Swine Fever’s Tragedy of the Commons

 

By Jennifer Shike, Farm Journal's Pork, Editor

via AgWeb - Dec 5, 2018

 

No matter how many miles separate China and the U.S., they are connected by shared and limited resources. As African swine fever (ASF) wages war on the world’s largest pork-producing nation, it also threatens the U.S. Whether we like it or not, we are all in this together, says Gordon Spronk, DVM, of Pipestone Veterinary Services. He believes this relationship can best be explained by the “tragedy of the commons” concept.

 

“A good example of the tragedy of the commons is sharing of limited resources like fishing grounds,” says Spronk, a member of the National Pork Producers Council’s (NPPC) Board of Directors. “If one party goes in and takes all the fish during a critical season, then they impact the use of that resource for everyone. We all share a common interest in making sure everyone understands the importance of maintenance of the resource and sharing of limited resources by everyone.”

 

This concept applies to the current ASF situation, Spronk says. But in this case, we’re talking about the shared resource of healthy swine herds and the direct value of keeping the ASF virus out of everyone’s swine herds.

 

“Whatever we can do to help China [they currently have ASF, while the U.S. does not] helps us,” Spronk says. “Half the pigs in our world are there. Anything we can do to assist them is beneficial to us all.”

 

As the world’s largest pork-consuming nation, China is an important trading partner for U.S. pork. Last year, about 17% of total U.S. pork exports went to China.

 

“We are eager for the current trade dispute to end and for the restoration of more favorable access to the Chinese market,” he says. “We also support the continued evolution of China’s pork production system, including the adoption of international, science-based production and animal welfare practices supported by the U.S.”

 

It’s Not 1960

 

Today’s agricultural scene is vastly different than it was in the 1960s when the U.S. pork industry eliminated hog cholera, for example, Spronk says.

 

“We live in a different world now — the ability of people and goods to travel rapidly between countries changes the risk profile and probabilities,” he says.

 

It’s not just veterinarians and pigs moving, the entire global economy is on the go all the time. Products are flown from one country to another in the same day. This heightens the importance of NPPC’s animal disease-related asks for the new farm bill, he adds.

 

“The impact of a foot-and-mouth disease outbreak, which, like ASF, would immediately close all export markets, would cost the beef, pork, corn and soybean sectors alone almost $200 billion over 10 years,” Spronk says. “NPPC is asking for mandatory farm bill funding for the vaccine bank, the National Animal Health Laboratory Network and for state animal health agencies for foreign animal disease (FAD) emergencies preparation. This funding is more important than ever, given the current ASF threat and the lack of a vaccine to contain an outbreak.”

 

Shared, Yet Varied Challenges ...

 

Dead Pig Disposal Dilemma ...

 

more

https://www.agweb.com/article/african-swine-fevers-tragedy-of-the-commons/

 

 

Keep America ASF-free following proper Customs protocol

Travelers declaring they have been to an ASF-positive country should be diverted to a secondary ag screening.

 

Source: Swine Health Information Center

via National Hog Farmer - Dec 05, 2018

 

Potential modes of transmission of African swine fever, and other foreign animal diseases, to the U.S. swine herd are being researched. Contaminated feedstuffs sourced from infected countries are a possible vector, but so are the millions of people traveling internationally each day.

 

For that reason, the Swine Health Information Center, National Pork Board, National Pork Producers Council and American Association of Swine Veterinarians are reminding travelers to learn and be aware of the proper screening procedures as they return to the United States.

 

When returning to the United States after visiting a farm or being in contact with animals in a country (or countries) with ASF, or any other FAD, you should declare this information to U.S. Customs and Border Patrol via written form, airport kiosk or verbally. Then you should be diverted for an ag secondary screening by an ag specialist. Unfortunately, reports to pork industry organizations indicate the secondary screening is not taking place routinely as required.

 

To help the industry understand the scope of this issue and safeguard the health of the U.S. swine herd, the SHIC, NPB, NPPC and the AASV are asking you to report your experience if you are not diverted for the secondary screening when you return to the United States following overseas travel.

 

SHIC Executive Director Paul Sundberg will be aggregating this information which will be shared on behalf of these four industry organizations with Customs and Border Patrol in an effort to quantify this suspected lapse. Again, if you are not diverted for secondary screening after declaring you have been on a farm or in contact with animals in an ASF or other FAD-positive nation, email the following information to Sundberg:

 

more

https://www.nationalhogfarmer.com/animal-health/keep-america-asf-free-following-proper-customs-protocol

 

 

African Swine Fever Hot Topic at Midwest Pork Conference

 

By Eric Pfeiffer, Hoosier Ag Today

Dec 4, 2018

 

At the Midwest Pork Conference in Hendricks County on Tuesday, African Swine Fever (ASF) was a major topic of conversation. Brett Stuart is the president of a company called Global AgriTrends that conducts and delivers global agriculture research.

 

“There is no doubt the Chinese government is very concerned about this situation. This is a disease with no vaccine, it’s now spread 2400 miles far and wide across China, it’s largely uncontrolled, and it will kill millions of hogs.”

 

Indiana State Veterinarian Dr. Bret Marsh spoke three months ago to the day about ASF with Hoosier Ag Today. Since then, things have only gotten worse in China.

 

“We had hoped, of course, with the steps taken by the Chinese government that they could contain the virus. That’s clearly not been the case as we continue to get new cases reported in new provinces. None the less, it keeps us on high alert here in the United States and certainly here in Indiana with our pork industry making sure we’re as prepared as possible.”

 

Marsh says it’s imperative that producers are looking for things that are out of the ordinary or unusual. He says ASF won’t produce blisters on the snout or at the top of the hoof like some other diseases...

 

more, including audio

https://www.hoosieragtoday.com/african-swine-fever-hot-topic-midwest-pork-conference/