In this file:

 

·         Can Americans eat less meat? It’s looking promising

According to recent marketing data and trend reports, a tsunami of dietary change is beginning to wash ashore.

 

·         Why people become vegans: The history, sex and science of a meatless existence

… The late celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain famously quipped that meat avoiders “are the enemy of everything good and decent in the human spirit”…

 

·         ‘Fake’ Vegan Meatballs Might Save the World Says Author, Michael Pollan

Author Michael Pollan has finally embraced “fake” meat after having a positive dining experience involving veggie meatballs...

 

 

Can Americans eat less meat? It’s looking promising

According to recent marketing data and trend reports, a tsunami of dietary change is beginning to wash ashore.

 

By Avery Yale Kamila, Portland Press Herald (ME)

Dec 5, 2018

 

The “Missing Pathways to 1.5°C” report is part of a wider body of scientific research connecting the dots between eating animals and our rapidly changing climate. Report co-author and College of the Atlantic professor Doreen Stabinsky, Ph.D., told me that climate scientists are not so much frustrated as “really freaked out” by the inaction of policy makers and the general public, who continue to eat animal-based diets.

 

I too find today’s Standard American Diet distressing. Here in the U.S., we all know many people who eat meat once a day, and some (the heaviest meat eaters who contribute an outsized portion of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere) who eat animal products at every meal.

 

But this is today. What about tomorrow?

 

According to recent marketing data and trend reports, a tsunami of dietary change is beginning to wash ashore.

 

For instance, the Good Food Institute released Nielsen sales data for the 12 months prior to August showing purchases of plant-based foods grew 17 percent while overall retail food sales grew only 2 percent during the same period. Plant-based meat sales showed added traction, jumping 23 percent during the year.

 

Caroline Bushnell, senior marketing manager at the Good Food Institute, expects to see plant-based food sales continue their upwards trajectory.

 

“Plant-based milk is the most developed plant-based category,” Bushnell told me, “and accounts for about half of all plant-based sales.”

 

She notes that fewer people buy plant-based meat compared to those who buy plant-based milk. Bushnell said this creates a “clear upside for plant-based meat to be purchased by three times as many households.”

 

Rather than a crystal ball to predict the future, Bushnell tends to use the rear view mirror. She points out that soy, almond and other plant-based milks became more widely adopted once they were stocked in the “refrigerated milk case.” A mere two years ago, the Beyond Meat burgers broke a similar barrier, becoming the first plant-based meat to be sold in major supermarket meat cases.

 

As a result, 86 percent of people buying Beyond Meat products are meat eaters, according to its distributor.

 

A Gallup poll released in August found that the number of vegans in the United States has jumped 50 percent since 2012, while the percentage of vegetarians is holding steady at 5 percent. Young people continue to have the highest rates of veg eating, according to the poll.

 

Gallup also discovered that 11 percent of liberal Americans identify as vegetarians and vegans while just 2 percent of conservatives do. This means cities like Portland are home to a great many more vegetarians and vegans than national data had previously suggested.

 

Coupled with the recent sales figures for plant-based foods, Gallup concludes that its poll results indicate more Americans are reducing their purchases of meat and dairy.

 

I remember the days when people used to compare vegan food to cardboard, so I was surprised to learn that, in 2018, the No. 1 reason people buy and eat plant-based foods is because of its taste, according to market research firm Mintel...

 

more

https://www.pressherald.com/2018/12/05/can-americans-eat-less-meat-its-looking-promising/

 

 

Why people become vegans: The history, sex and science of a meatless existence

 

By Joshua T. Beck, University of Oregon

via Philly Voice - Dec 5, 2018

 

At the age of 14, a young Donald Watson watched as a terrified pig was slaughtered on his family farm. In the British boy’s eyes, the screaming pig was being murdered. Watson stopped eating meat and eventually gave up dairy as well.

 

Later, as an adult in 1944, Watson realized that other people shared his interest in a plant-only diet. And thus veganism – a term he coined – was born.

 

Flash-forward to today, and Watson’s legacy ripples through our culture. Even though only 3 percent of Americans actually identify as vegan, most people seem to have an unusually strong opinion about these fringe foodies – one way or the other.

 

As a behavioral scientist with a strong interest in consumer food movements, I thought November – World Vegan Month – would be a good time to explore why people become vegans, why they can inspire so much irritation and why many of us meat-eaters may soon join their ranks.

 

IT'S AN IDEOLOGY NOT A CHOICE

 

Like other alternative food movements such as locavorism, veganism arises from a belief structure that guides daily eating decisions.

 

They aren’t simply moral high-grounders. Vegans do believe it’s moral to avoid animal products, but they also believe it’s healthier and better for the environment.

 

Also, just like Donald Watson’s story, veganism is rooted in early life experiences.

 

Psychologists recently discovered that having a larger variety of pets as a child increases tendencies to avoid eating meat as an adult. Growing up with different sorts of pets increases concern for how animals are treated more generally.

 

Thus, when a friend opts for Tofurky this holiday season, rather than one of the 45 million turkeys consumed for Thanksgiving, his decision isn’t just a high-minded choice. It arises from beliefs that are deeply held and hard to change.

 

VEGANISM AS A SYMBOLIC THREAT

 

That doesn’t mean your faux-turkey loving friend won’t seem annoying if you’re a meat-eater.

 

The late celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain famously quipped that meat avoiders “are the enemy of everything good and decent in the human spirit.”

 

Why do some people find vegans so irritating? In fact, it might be more about “us” than them.

 

Most Americans think meat is an important part of a healthy diet. The government recommends eating 2-3 portions (5-6 ounces) per day of everything from bison to sea bass. As tribal humans, we naturally form biases against individuals who challenge our way of life, and because veganism runs counter to how we typically approach food, vegans feel threatening.

 

Humans respond to feelings of threat by derogating outgroups. Two out of 3 vegans experience discrimination daily, 1 in 4 report losing friends after “coming out” as vegan, and 1 in 10 believe being vegan cost them a job.

 

Veganism can be hard on a person’s sex life, too. Recent research finds that the more someone enjoys eating meat, the less likely they are to swipe right on a vegan. Also, women find men who are vegan less attractive than those who eat meat, as meat-eating seems masculine.

 

CROSSING THE VEGAN DIVIDE ...

 

WATSON'S LEGACY ...

 

more, including links  

https://www.phillyvoice.com/origin-veganism-vegans-history-sex-science-meatless-existence/

 

 

‘Fake’ Vegan Meatballs Might Save the World Says Author, Michael Pollan

 

Kat Smith, Live Kindly

Dec 4, 2018

 

Author Michael Pollan has finally embraced “fake” meat after having a positive dining experience involving veggie meatballs.

 

In a recent Mashable article author Chris Taylor explores what the future of food, particularly meat, will look like. Taylor points to speculative fiction, which presented the idea of nutrition pills, synthesized meals, and food-like substances that would eventually replace traditional food as the source of our nutrition. When it comes to “food-like substances,” we are already there – at least, partially.

 

Taylor spoke to Pollan, author of “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” and “In Defense of Food,” a man known for his support of the slow food movement and the famous first line in the latter book: “Eat Food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”

 

Despite his advocacy of a plant-forward diet, Pollan has been an unabashed supporter of meat and an advocate of practices such as avoiding products with labels that feature unpronounceable, “artificial” ingredients. But, the rise of high-tech vegan meats seems to have changed the Harvard professor’s mind.

 

Pollan revealed that he had a taste of “fake” food his grandmother wouldn’t recognize – vegetarian meatballs made from Impossible Foods’ plant-based meat. He had gotten a taste of a marinara-smothered veggie meatball sub at Boston-based mini-chain, Clover, and he liked it.

 

The real food proponent said that it was “uncanny how much it looks and behaves like real meat,” but “a little more granular, a little more oatmealy” than beef. The realistic plant-based protein created by Silicon Valley startup Impossible Foods is famous for its similar it to traditional meat, right down to the juicy, umami flavor. Although it is most famous in burger form, it arrives in restaurants like Clover in “raw” form, like ground beef, allowing chefs to exercise their culinary muscles. Once available only in restaurants and select foodservice outlets, Impossible meat is expected to make its retail debut next year.

 

“By my standards, it’s not food. Doesn’t mean I’m against it,” the author continued. Impossible meat is made from potato protein, wheat protein, coconut oil, and “heme,” short for soy leghemoglobin. This processed, iron-rich component is Impossible Foods’ key to making realistic meat from plant-based ingredients.

 

Why the sudden change of heart? In recent years, the growing body of scientific evidence that places industrial animal agriculture front-and-center as the leading cause of human-caused climate change has become difficult to ignore...

 

more

https://www.livekindly.co/vegan-meatballs-save-world-omnivores-dilemma-author-michael-pollan/