In this file:

 

·         African swine fever closes in on Southeast Asia

Thailand, Vietnam and neighboring countries scramble to prevent contagion

 

·         Killer Pig Virus Gets Closer to Beijing, Shanghai

African swine fever has spread to more than 20 provinces

Disease control measures risk causing major economic burden

 

·         ASF in China gets closer to Russia

… The latest ASF incident in China was registered near the border with Russia’s Far East region, where some processors are hoping to launch major pig farming projects in the next few years, according to Russian veterinary watchdog Rosselkhoznadzor… 

 

·         UK: Eustice sets out Government ASF contingency plans

… The disease control measures are set out in the Great Britain African and Classical swine fever control strategy, he added…

 

·         African swine fever: How did the Spaniards eradicate it?

Many of the tests we use today for rapid detection both in swine and ticks comes from Spain’s experience.

 

 

 

African swine fever closes in on Southeast Asia

Thailand, Vietnam and neighboring countries scramble to prevent contagion

 

Dominic Faulder, Nikkei Asian Review

November 29, 2018

 

BANGKOK -- China's African swine fever outbreak is creeping toward Southeast Asia, alarming authorities and pig farmers alike.

 

Since August, when it was first detected in the northwestern province of Liaoning, near North Korea, the highly virulent pathogen has spread to 20 Chinese provinces. More than 70 outbreaks have been reported, and more than 600,000 hogs have been culled. The number is a tiny percentage of China's more than 700 million pigs, which make up about 55% of the global population, according to the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization.

 

Pork is the primary meat in China, which means African swine fever, sometimes dubbed ASF, has the potential to undermine the country's food industry and affect global food supplies. There is no vaccine.

 

At the beginning of this month, the virus was detected in the village of Guanfang, in the southwestern province of Yunnan, less than 200 km from Myanmar and Laos.

 

On Monday, Thailand's Department of Livestock Development reported that ASF had been detected in sausages that Chinese tourists had brought with them on a flight from the city of Chengdu to Chiang Rai, according to Thai media reports. Chiang Rai is located in the north of Thailand, near Myanmar and Laos.

 

The department in September banned the import of pigs and pork products, stationing personnel at borders and in airports to enforce a quarantine, according to earlier news reports.

 

Jeerasak Pipattanapongsophon, deputy director-general of Thailand's Department of Livestock Development, last month admitted the situation is grim. "If the disease spreads into Thailand," he said, "it will cause massive damage to the country's pig-farm industry."

 

Thailand's pork industry, worth $3.3 billion a year, is considered the region's most advanced. Charoen Pokphand Foods and Betagro together account for some 40% of production. By some estimates, up to 80% of Thai pork is raised on large farms, which should improve biosecurity and quality. Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, and Vietnam raise hogs in far more basic conditions.

 

Vietnam is taking similar measures as Thailand, and Cambodia, which sits between the countries, is trying to raise awareness of the outbreak and work with officials in neighboring countries.

 

In Myanmar, 90% of "domestic pork production currently relies on smallholders" and is "inefficient by international standards," according to the Myanmar Times. The situation is similar to that in China, which leaves the country vulnerable to the outbreak.

 

In Cambodia, there are fears the fever could decimate the country's pork industry. "[ASF] is a major concern for our farmers," Srun Poav of the Cambodian Livestock Raisers Association told The Phnom Penh Post in early September. "If this disease spreads to our country, the industry could collapse. The virus could kill all the pigs in the country within a week of its introduction in Cambodia."

 

The speed of transmission is of particular concern. Vincent ter Beek, editor of Pig Progress, an animal husbandry magazine, noted that in Europe it took the virus 11 years to travel 3,000 km from Georgia to the Czech Republic. "In China, however, the virus spread from Shenyang in northern China to Wenzhou, south of Shanghai, in about three weeks," he said. "That equals a distance of 2,100km."

 

More than half of China's hogs are raised in unhygienic backyards that are virtually impossible to regulate...

 

more

https://asia.nikkei.com/Economy/African-swine-fever-closes-in-on-Southeast-Asia

 

 

Killer Pig Virus Gets Closer to Beijing, Shanghai

 

    African swine fever has spread to more than 20 provinces

    Disease control measures risk causing major economic burden

 

Bloomberg News

November 29, 2018

 

A killer pig virus that began spreading in China four months ago has picked up pace, causing at least one fresh outbreak on average a day this month and encroaching on major cities including Beijing and Shanghai.

 

At least 20 provinces covering most of China’s northeastern, eastern and central areas have reported pigs infected with African swine fever, which isn’t known to harm humans but typically causes hogs to die within days. Authorities have stepped up surveillance around border areas after the disease was found close to North Korea, Myanmar, Vietnam and Laos.

 

About 600,000 pigs have been culled to stem the disease, which threatens to disrupt China’s $128 billion pork industry. The presence of the virus in commercial, backyard and wild pigs, as well as evidence that infected animals have entered food supply chains, “indicate a significant challenge ahead to achieve eradication,” Matthew Stone, a deputy director general of the World Organization for Animal Health in Paris, said in an email.

 

Veterinary officials met in Beijing last week to assist neighboring countries prepare for possible further international spread, especially through the informal movement of pigs, pork products and contaminated food that may be used as livestock feed. Even with strict quarantine and provincial pig-transportation controls, the virus has managed to travel thousands of kilometers across China, which accounts for half of the world’s swine herd.

 

‘Same Risks’ ...

 

Prompt Response ... 

 

more, including map, links   

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-11-29/killer-pig-virus-nears-china-s-major-cities-as-spread-quickens

 

 

ASF in China gets closer to Russia

 

By Vladislav Vorotnikov, GlobalMeatNews

30-Nov-2018

 

Russian authorities are raising the alarm after an outbreak of African swine fever (ASF) was detected in an area of China close to the Russian border.

 

The latest ASF incident in China was registered near the border with Russia’s Far East region, where some processors are hoping to launch major pig farming projects in the next few years, according to Russian veterinary watchdog Rosselkhoznadzor.

 

ASF in China has already reached the Russian border, claimed Nikolay Vlasov, deputy director of Rosselkhoznadzor during a press conference in Moscow on 22 November. Taking into account the huge volume of illegal cross-border trade between the two countries, there is a high risk that ASF could break out in Primorsky Krai, Amur Oblast and Khabarovsk Krai – three Far East areas considered free from ASF up to now, according to Vlasov.

 

Vlasov stressed that Rosselkhoznadzor was deeply concerned about the threat of ASF in Russia’s Far East region. He said the veterinary body “has been knocking on every door, issuing warnings about the disease​”, although local authorities have not yet taken any official measures to prevent the introduction of the virus into this part of the country.

 

In a statement on its website, Rosselkhoznadzor said that an outbreak of ASF in the Far East region could have a much worse environmental impact than in the European region of Russia. The veterinary body explained that the region was home to endangered species, such as Siberian tigers and Amur leopards, both of which existed alongside wild boars. Although, these predators are not vulnerable to the ASF virus themselves, there were concerns any local outbreak of the disease might leave them without a feed base.

 

Safety island​ ...

 

more

https://www.globalmeatnews.com/Article/2018/11/30/ASF-approaches-Russian-border

 

 

Eustice sets out Government ASF contingency plans

 

By Alistair Driver, Pig World (UK)

November 30, 2018

 

Farming Minister George Eustice has outlined the steps the Government is taking to try and keep African swine fever out of the country.

 

Responding to a question from the DUP’s Jim Shannon, who chairs the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Eggs, Pigs and Poultry, Mr Eustice (pictured speaking at a recent APPG reception) said Defra has robust contingency plans in place to respond to outbreaks of disease such as ASF, which are regularly tested.

 

The disease control measures are set out in the Great Britain African and Classical swine fever control strategy, he added.

 

“In response to the spread of ASF in Eastern Europe, and confirmation of the disease in feral pigs in Belgium, Defra’s risk assessment level has been raised to medium,” he said.

 

“This has been widely communicated to the industry and pig keepers. Disease control measures put in place in affected countries in Europe should ensure that no live pigs or wild boar, meat or products reach the UK through legal trade. It is already illegal to import any wild boar into the UK.

 

“An ongoing communications campaign organised by Defra, the Scottish Government, Welsh Government, and DAERA in Northern Ireland, together with the pig industry and veterinary bodies, has been raising awareness of the risks of the introduction of ASF to the UK...

 

more

http://www.pig-world.co.uk/news/eustice-sets-out-government-asf-contingency-plans.html

 

 

African swine fever: How did the Spaniards eradicate it?

Many of the tests we use today for rapid detection both in swine and ticks comes from Spain’s experience.

 

Ann Hess, National Hog Farmer

Nov 30, 2018

 

Teddy Roosevelt once said, “I believe that the more you know about the past, the better you are prepared for the future.”

 

Those words struck me recently after attending a session on African swine fever at the National Pork Producers Council Fall Alliance Meeting when Neil Dierks, NPPC chief executive officer, mentioned maybe we need to revisit Spain’s history with the virus and how they were able to stamp it out. My ears perked up at the comment, and yes, my mouth began to salivate at the thought of tasting Jamón ibérico again too, but mostly I was just intrigued to know more about their situation. Thankfully Dierks pointed me to a vault of information on ASF and Spain.

 

Peter Fernandez, a former Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service veterinarian, got his start at the Plum Island Animal Disease Center as a technician in the late-1970s and studied for five years in Spain in the mid-1980s before coming back to the United States and taking his role with APHIS as a foreign service officer overseas. He is an infectious disease epidemiologist and the co-author of the World Organization for Animal Health Atlas of Transboundary Animal Diseases. Fernandez is also an instructor of foreign animal diseases at PIADC and provides lectures on ASF.

 

And Fernandez says the swine industry could learn a thing or two today from Spain’s experience with ASF.

 

Spain’s history with ASF

 

When the disease first entered the southwest European country in the 1960s, control was rather difficult...

 

... By 1995, Spain became officially clear of ASF. Portugal declared itself free in 1993, but the virus reemerged in 1999. Fernandez says this final occurrence was likely due to an infected tick that survived eradication as they have been documented to remain infected well over 600 days.

 

What can we learn from Spain?

 

You need a good indemnification program...

 

You need solid collaboration...

 

You need solid science...

 

You need an economic driver...

 

What can the U.S. industry take away? ...

 

more

https://www.nationalhogfarmer.com/business/african-swine-fever-how-did-spaniards-eradicate-it