In this file:

 

·         Virus found in pond used to destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria and save patient

·         Planned Antimicrobial Use Changes Retain Flexibility

 

 

Virus found in pond used to destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria and save patient

'Antibiotic resistance is becoming a more serious problem so phages are a good alternative'

 

Jane Dalton, Independent (UK)

Mar 12, 2018

 

Doctors have used a virus from a lake to save a heart patient when antibiotics failed to tackle a chest infection.

 

The outcome of the experimental treatment suggests this could be an effective treatment against other antibiotic-resistant infections, said the US researchers.

 

The elderly patient, reported to be a doctor himself, had undergone heart surgery but several weeks later suffered complications from a life-threatening bacterial infection in his heart.

 

Repeated courses of antibiotics proved ineffective, and the infection returned, with the patient ending up back in hospital each time. So doctors tried a novel approach using bacteriophages – a type of virus that infects bacteria – that were collected from a pond in Niantic, Connecticut, and inserted into his chest.

 

The treatment appeared to eradicate the patient's infection, according to a new report of the case from the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven. The lake that the “phages” came from was just 40 miles from Yale.

 

Scientists announced the outcome and published the study in the journal Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health, saying larger studies were needed.

 

Ben Chan, the research scientist involved, said: “Antibiotic resistance is becoming a more serious problem now, so phages are a good alternative.” Mr Chan has phage samples from all over the world, sent to him by researchers who pan for microbes in various locations...

 

more

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/doctors-virus-lake-water-save-treat-patient-infection-antibiotics-fail-a8252671.html

 

 

Planned Antimicrobial Use Changes Retain Flexibility

 

Dr. Greg Wideman - South West Ontario Veterinary Services

Farmscape for March 13, 2018

 

A veterinarian with South West Ontario Veterinary Services says the Government of Canada's approach to curbing the over use of antibiotics offers much more flexibility than that of other nations.

 

The Government of Canada is tightening regulations governing the use of antibiotics in livestock production.

 

"Medications-The changing rules" will be discussed during the London Swine Conference set for March 27 and 28.

 

Dr. Greg Wideman, a veterinarian and partner with South West Ontario Veterinary Services, says antibiotic use is under public scrutiny because of the potential negative impact of antimicrobial resistance on human health.

 

Clip-Dr. Greg Wideman-South West Ontario Veterinary Services:

 

On a farm where we have a disease that is challenging for animal welfare and food safety and productivity that is there through no fault of the producer, if we had a western European style of antimicrobial reduction control where we had a hard threshold, I think that there is a real risk there that even in spite of good management that producers who have the misfortune to be infected with a severe disease would have trouble falling underneath the required threshold.

 

In Canada's approach we are still going to be allowed to execute professional judgment on the use of antimicrobials on the farm.

 

We're gong to be able to respond with antimicrobials if and when a disease arrives at a farm.

 

In that management is and will continue to be extremely important but I'm comforted by the fact that we are still going to have access to all of the antimicrobials we have access to now as needed on specific farms in specific situations.

 

more

http://www.farmscape.com/f2ShowScript.aspx?i=26445&q=Planned+Antimicrobial+Use+Changes+Retain+Flexibility