In this file:

 

·         Mexico, Canada Don’t Want Tariff Exemptions Tied to NAFTA

·         Soy Growers Worried About Possible Trade Disruptions at U.S. Ports

 

 

Mexico, Canada Don’t Want Tariff Exemptions Tied to NAFTA

 

BY NAFB

via KTIC (NE) - March 12, 2018

 

Mexico and Canada were happy to hear about President’s Trump’s willingness to exclude them from tariffs on steel and aluminum exports to the U.S.

 

However, they expect any talks about a possible permanent exemption to take place outside of the North American Free Trade Agreement negotiations. Politico quotes the Mexican Economy Ministry in a release that says, “The process of negotiations for the NAFTA modernization continues on a course independent of this or any other internal political measure that the U.S. government takes.” Also, Canada “won’t rest until the prospect of these duties is fully and permanently lifted,” Cynthia Freeland told reporters in Toronto.

 

She also says the tariff discussions and NAFTA negotiations are completely different, adding that, “We treat them on totally separate tracks.” However, Trump more directly tied Canada and Mexico’s exclusion from the tariffs to a successful NAFTA outcome. “We’re going to hold off the tariff on these two countries to see whether or not we can make a successful deal on NAFTA,” he said during a signing ceremony for the two proclamations that will impose the 25 percent tariff on steel imports and 10 percent tariff on aluminum...

 

more

http://kticradio.com/agricultural/mexico-canada-dont-want-tariff-exemptions-tied-to-nafta/

 

 

Soy Growers Worried About Possible Trade Disruptions at U.S. Ports

 

BY NAFB

via KTIC (NE) - March 12, 2018

 

The American Soybean Association and its grower-members are urging labor union and port management representatives to get back to the negotiating table and resume bargaining talks.

 

The ASA is concerned about possible trade disruptions at East Coast and Gulf of Mexico ports, which would negatively impact agricultural and food product exports to key markets. The ASA joined several industry stakeholders in sending a letter to the International Longshore Association and the United States Maritime Alliance, asking them to resume negotiations as soon as possible.

 

The letter says, “Reaching a contract agreement before the current one expires will provide supply chain stakeholders with the certainty they need for their operations. Supply chain disruptions arising out of previous negotiations have been well documented.” The letter goes on to say that these kinds of disruptions can have enormous adverse economic impacts...

 

more

http://kticradio.com/agricultural/soy-growers-worried-about-possible-trade-disruptions-at-u-s-ports/